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History: Journal Articles & Databases

Why Use Journals?

  • Articles are more up-to-date than books
  • They offer greater detail and insight into research
  • Peer-reviewed articles are considered more reliable

Understanding An Article Reference

A correctly formatted reference will tell you exactly where to find the article.

M. Kishlansky, 'Mission Impossible: Charles I, Oliver Cromwell and the Regicide', English Historical Review, 125 (2010), 844-74.

This article was written by M. Kishlansky, and the article's title is  'Mission Impossible: Charles I, Oliver Cromwell and the Regicide'. It was published in 2010 in the journal called English Historical Review. It was published in volume 125, and the article runs from page 844 to 874.

How Do I Reference An Article?

Referencing articles you've used is important - it demonstrates that you've researched your topic, it allows others to find the article to read for themselves, and it avoids accusations of plagairism.

Check out our Citing and Referencing page for more information. 

Resources to find journal articles

Off-Campus Access

Very few of our resources are freely available to any web user. If you're at home, the easiest way around this problem is to sign into the University's SVE service.

Another option is to set up VPN on your device. iSolutions provide guidance on how to set up VPN in this article

Alternatively, some resources may have an "institutional" or "Shibboleth" login option. Use this and log in with your University username and password.

How Do I Know If You Have It?

Found a good article? Now you need to know whether you can get the full text.

If you've run a database search, the article's record may have a "Full Text" or "PDF" link - that's great: click to get the full text. If not, look out for the Full Text Finder icon - click this to find out if we have access to the journal. 

 

No Full Text?

Important article? Can't get the full text? Try our Inter-Library Loans service...