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Open Access & Institutional Repository: Copyright and Licences

What version of my article can I upload to our Institutional repository?

The publisher of your article will specify which version you can upload. This could be:

Pre-print: This is your original draft, prior to peer review and publisher’s corrections. Pre-print versions do not normally meet funder requirements.

Post-print: This is your corrected version of the draft, following the peer review process. Also known as the Accepted Manuscript (AM) or Accepted Author Manuscript (AAM). The content is the same as the Publisher's Version (see below), but the layout will be different.

Publisher’s Version or Published Journal Article or Version of Record (VoR): This is the final published article.

SHERPA/FACT will tell you which version of your article you can upload into our institutional repository.

Useful links

Creative Commons Licences

Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools. 

Creative Commons (CC) has written copyright licences which provide a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your creative work — on conditions of your choice. 

There are several different CC licences, all of which require attribution of the author (denoted by BY in all licences' names).

CC BYThis licence lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation.

CC BY-NCThis licence lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.

CC BY-SAThis licence lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.

CC BY-NDThis licence allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you.

CC BY-NC-SAThis licence lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.

CC BY-NC-NDThis licence is the most restrictive, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.

 

RCUK and Wellcome expect all articles published as Open Access in journals to have a CC BY licence.

If you are uploading an RCUK-funded article into a subject or institutional repository, you need to have the equivalent of a CC-BY-NC licence.

 

Contact Us

For help or advice with any Open Access or Institutional Repository queries please email eprints@soton.ac.uk

Copyright Transfer Agreements

Publishers will usually ask you to sign a publication agreement to allow them to publish your article. Until you sign this, you have copyright of the article.

The publication agreement usually requires you to transfer your copyright to the publisher, meaning you are now restricted by the publisher as to how you re-use or distribute your article. For example, you may not be able to upload the final version of your article into ePrints or onto your own webpage.

One way around this is to make your own amendments to the publication agreement before you sign it. SPARC has created a standard Author Addendum, which "is a legal instrument that modifies the publisher’s agreement and allows you to keep key rights to your articles."



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